Recent Cryptologic Bytes

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  • The groundbreaking for Army Cyber Command’s new complex at Fort Gordon, Georgia, represents a crucial turning point for the nation’s ability to fight in the cyber domain and diminish gaps in capability, Army leaders said. Click on the image or title to learn more.

  • On 2 December, three UMUC students visited the National Cryptologic Museum as they kicked off a 3 week cybersecurity roadtrip. RoadTrip Nation and UMUC are sponsoring the trip that will be filmed and produced as a one-hour documentary to air on public television in 2017. The "Road Trippers" met with Pat Weadon at the Museum to explore the exhibits and learn about the cryptologic profession's impact on our history. Click the image or title to read more about the trip and the students.

  • On 22 November 2016, President Obama awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom to 21 individuals. Among the recipients were computing pioneers Grace Hopper and Margaret Hamilton. Grace Hopper's granddaughter attended the ceremony and received the award on behalf of her grandmother. Hamilton, age 80, was present to receive the award. Click on the image or title to learn more.

  • The NCMF's social media community responded to our request for book recommendations from their own cryptologic libraries. Check out their suggestions and see what you might add to your library. If you have books to add to the list, please email webadmin@cryptologicfoundation.org

  • Knox College professor John E. Dooley's latest book (April 2016) Codes, Ciphers, and Spies: Tales of Military Intelligence in World War I" reveals an unlikely hero in the U.S. Army's struggle to decode secret enemy messages during World War I.

  • Article via IQ Intel explores the pioneering work by Hedy Lamarr in the field of early wireless technology. "Unhappy being pigeonholed due to her looks, the “most beautiful woman in the world” set out to develop a secret communication system that would take down Nazi submarines......"

  • The technology that keeps your text messages private had its start on the banks of the Tigris River, 3500 years ago.

  • Enjoy this three part series by NBC Washington-News4's Barbara Harrison, and follow the life of James Pryde, a Tuskegee Airman who became one of the "invisible cryptologists." Also interviewed for the series is David Hatch, NSA Historian.

  • Edward Rothstein of "The New York Times" provides a thorough review of the NSA's fascinating "public face," the National Cryptologic Museum.